Together We Will End Hunger, Malnourishment, and Homelessness

Harvest Day

The UC Gill Tract Community Farm is a collaborative community project between the University of California Berkeley and the local community, focused on issues of food justice and urban farming.  It is located in Albany, CA, at the corner of San Pablo Ave and Marin Ave.

It is an urban farm where you can come and harvest food for yourself and your family in exchange for help with weeding, planting, and watering; it aims to supply fresh organic food to anyone who lacks access to it in our East Bay communities. Currently, half of harvested produce goes straight back to the Food Pantry for food insecure students.


There are multiple ways to get involved with UC Gill Tract!

  • Come out to Harvest Days throughout the year from 10am-1pm and contribute to maintaining the garden while also harvesting food for you and your family. The next days for the 2016-17 academic year are the following:
    • December 4th
    • January 22nd
    • February 26
    • March 19th
    • April 30th
  • Community members are working with representatives of UC Berkeley’s College of Natural Resources to create a stewardship council that will jointly govern the land as we learn about, research, and address food needs in the East Bay region and beyond. You are welcome to get involved at any level, whether that is joining a working group or the governance council, or simply coming to join us during our open hours.

For directions via car, AC public transit, bike or foot, visit this page. 


The UC Gill Tract Community Farm is one of the increasing number of urban agriculture and alternative sustainable food systems worldwide that exist to develop innovative local solutions to social, environmental and economic injustices.
Harvest day was a wonderful experience where I was able to learn the history of the farm as well as interact with the different systems that help crops grow.
— Zeltzin Angon
I’m really energized by the work we all did harvesting food for our student community. Often times, we journey through life doing what we are passionate about, and make a difference as much as possible, without acknowledgement. When I went to the food pantry, however, the work we all do was genuinely brought home. Keep up the passion, folks. It matters!
— Sophie Loeb